JANE EYRE KEY PASSAGES

KEY PASSAGES

CH 2 Red room

CH 4 Defying Mrs Reed

CH 7 Lowood punishment

CH 9 Helen dies

CH 12 Rochester´s first appearance

CH 13+14 Jane and Rochester´s conversations

CH 15 Jane saves Rochester from fire

CH 20 Mr Mason gets attacked

CH 23 Rochester´s 1st proposal

CH 25 Dreaming of babies

CH 26 The wedding Day

CH 27 Janes fleesThornfield

CH 28 Janes gets taken in by the Rivers

CH 34 St John´s 1st proposal

CH 35 St John´s 2nd proposal

CH 37 Rochester´s 2nd proposal

CH 38 End of the novel

MONDAY 25th of August

TEST CONTENTS:

Analytical skills (connotation level – interpretation – diction)

Technical vocabulary (embody, depict, symbolise, portray, tone, mood, convey)

Narrative techniques (point of view, tense, speech, narration)

Characterisation – Character description (dialogues, actions and thoughts)

TEST RUBRIC:  Written Commentary-Rubric

3. Narrative technique

Have you ever read a story of which you already knew the ending? Why can such a story still be enjoyable? Often times, how a story is told is more important that what is told. Writers use narrative technique to deliver a story. Interesting narratives make for interesting reads. In short narrative technique consists of four components: point of view, narration, speech and tense. We can understand the importance of all four and how they function by asking a few questions:
Point of view – Who tells the story?
Narration – Who is the narrator speaking to?
Speech – How do the narrator and the characters of a story speak?
Tense – When did the events of a story happen?
Writers can accomplish a lot with these four tools. In this lesson we will see how one story can told in multiple ways using these four tools. The texts are taken from Exercises in Style by Raymond Queneau. You can split up the work among four groups, but eventually everyone should have experience working with each aspect of narrative technique. Each aspect is accompanied by a printable worksheet. By the end of this lesson, you should be able to discuss narrative technique using various literary terms, which ties in to the third learning outcome for Part 4.

Point of view
Who is telling the story? This question can only really have one of three answers:

The narrator of the story – This corresponds to the first-person point of view.
The reader of the story – This is known as second-person point of view.
Someone else, an outsider looking in – This is what we call third-person narration or point of view.

Narration
Who is the narrator talking to? This question really has three answers:

Direct narration – The narrator can talk directly to the reader.
Frame narration – A form of direct narration, this is where the narrator tells us someone else’s story. Although the story is technically told in the first person, we see more of the third person.
Indirect narration – The narrator may not be talking to us. The narrator may be talking to a nebulous, or absent audience, telling for the sake of telling a story.

Speech
How does the narrator speak? How does the narrator have character’s speak? There are several ways speech is handled in narratives.

Direct speech – The characters speak for themselves. Direct speech includes the use of dialogue and quotations. We hear the character’s speak directly. Nothing is summarized for us.
Reported speech – Opposite of direct speech. Here the narrator summarizes what others have said and done. We are retold a story.
Free indirect speech – This is a clever device typical of third person limited narration, where the narrator slips from telling us about the character’s thoughts to simple writing the character’s thoughts.

Tense
When does the story take place? Really there are only three answers to this question:

Past – The story is told in the past tense. Since events are already over, the narrator can decide in which order to tell them and which events are most important.
Present – In the present tense, event unfold before the reader’s eyes. The narrator is just as surprised by the events as the reader and has no knowledge of where the story is going. Sometimes the story really took place in the past but is told in the present for dramatic effect. This is called the historical present tense.
Future – Sometimes entire narratives are about events that will happen in the future. These take the form of predictions or instructions.

PRACTICE 1

Now that you are familiar with each aspect of narrative technique, try applying this knowledge to a text. Try writing a paragraph on narrative technique in preparation for an oral commentary or a Paper 1 commentary. Below is a text that is rich in narrative technique, the opening lines from The Gods Must Be Crazy by Jamie Uys. You can read this text and watch the video clip. What are the effects of narrative technique on the text’s audience? Write a paragraph that comments on all four aspects of narrative technique: point of view, narration, speech and tense.

NARRATIVE TECHNIQUE- Check for understanding

PRACTICE 2

  • Select a passage from JANE EYRE and write a paragraph that comments on all four aspects of narrative technique: POINT OF VIEW, NARRATION, SPEECH AND TENSE.

  • Record your comments this using EDUCREATIONS.

PRACTICE 3

Creative writing!
Perhaps the best way to develop an understanding of narrative technique is to try a bit of creative writing. You will watch a short music video that functions as a stimulus for the writing process. You can write alone or in groups. You can write with or without a word limit. Ideally the stories that you write should be read out loud in class, so that others can comment on the effects of the narrative techniques, including the use of tense, speech, narration and point of view.

HERE IS A COLLECTION OF TEXTS ON WHICH YOU CAN APPLY THE ELEMENTS OF NARRATIVE TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSE THEM IN THE LIGHT OF THE PREPARATION OF YOUR IB INDIVIDUAL ORAL

Extra material 20151006075404125

Characterisation 2

In the previous activity on characterization (Characterization 1), we asked ourselves how writers develop a character through dialogue, action and narration. Rather than focusing on how writers construct characters, we will ask ourselves in this lesson: “How do readers respond to characters?” We all seem to have an opinion about characters in literary works. How do we justify our responses to these characters?

In this lesson we will focus on a passage from Untouchable by Mulk Raj Anand. You see several adjectives that could be used to describe the main character. You can agree or disagree with these statements, justifying your answer with reference to the text. This kind of activity can be applied to any work that you are exploring for Parts 3 or 4. Furthermore it helps us explore a work in detail, which is the first learning outcome for Part 4.

Character descriptions

Below you see a list of adjectives that may or may not describe the character, Bakhu. Bakhu belongs to a group of people in India known as the ‘untouchables’. The are considered so dirty that they fall outside of the caste system. Read the passage and state why you agree or disagree with the adjectives as appropriate character descriptions. You can print out this worksheet (PDF) to do this activity in class. Or you can create your own worksheet by using the template in MS Word below.

 

CHARACTERISATION 2 L and L IB PROGRAMME 2014

Blog Assignment

Source: The Social Network FILM

Text type: A speech

Audience: At Harvard with Business and Engineering alumni

images-1

Purpose: to persuade / inform / argue

Number of words: 600 – 700

Themes / topics: Coolness, MASS MEDIA, Social Life, Money, Friendship, Ambition

Interesting quotes from the film:

” Sean Parker: YOu know what’s cooler than a million dollars?

Eduardo Saverin: you?

Sean Parker: a billion dollars”

 ” I was your only friend – you had one friend”

” there is a difference between being obsessed and motivated”

 Unknown

WRITE YOUR SPEECH AS IF YOU WERE ADDRESSING HARVARD ALUMNI IN A PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENT. APPEAL TO THE THEMES OF FRIENDSHIP, MASS MEDIA, MONEY, AMBITION AND COOLNESS. YOU HAVE TO NARROW DOWN THE TOPIC (Headline, subtopics, more specific ideas). YOU SHOULD SOUND CONVINCING ENOUGH SO THAT THEY BELIEVE IN YOUR WORDS OR GET THE FEELING THAT YOU ARE RIGHT IN WHAT YOU ARE SAYING.

At least have them think and reflect about your claim!

images

 This is another task for your blogs!

EXAM contents – Written task

Written task: Trabajo escrito basado en el módulo Lenguaje y medios masivos de comunicación. Opciones de tipos de texto: Brochure/Leaflet, Interview, Magazine article, News report, Report, Set of instructions, Speech.

Unidad: Language and Mass Communication To choose an adequate type of text with a clear purpose in mind
– To use terminology related to the varied text-types studied.
– To analyse the effects that language, structure, technique and style have on the reader
– To support and justify ideas with coherent examples.

Wednesday 02nd of July – 12:20 pm

RUBRIC HERE: WT-2boa51f

HOW TO WRITE A RATIONALE?

Writing Rationales for Written Tasks
AssessmentWritten tasksWT1 skillsWriting Rationales for Written Tasks
Writing the rationale to Written Tasks, type 1 can be challenging for students. Historically, the idea of writing Written Tasks borrows from the now moribund Language A2 course. A frequent lament of Language A2 Written Task examiners was that students were simply too ‘wordy’; at times, students would write a rationale which was appreciably longer than the Written Task which it accompanied. In part, it is this experience that motivates the decision to delimit the rationale in the Language and Literature course to a maximum of 300 words.

Teachers should really encourage their students to aim for the upper word limit of 300 words. This word limit, however, must not be exceeded; if it is, one mark is deducted from the student. If students write less than 200 words, no marks are automatically deducted. However, in this case, it is unlikely that students will achieve the maximum of 2 marks available for the rationale that shows ‘a clear explanation and understanding of the aspects being investigated’.

The point made above about word length is so important that it is worth repeating: Teachers should really encourage their students to aim for the upper word limit of 300 words. Beyond this, of course, the words need to be well chosen and the rationale should be clear and concise. But what should the student include?

The study guide says that a rationale must (my emphasis) explain the following:

• how the content of the task is linked to a particular part of the course

• how the task is intended to explore particular aspects of the course

• the nature of the task chosen

• information about audience, purpose and the varying contexts in which the task is set.

Moreover, the rationale should not only include knowledge about the text or topic studied, but also about the formal conventions of the text type produced and how they relate to the aims of the task.

In the following exercise, teachers should ask students to read the rationale (below), and identify the extent to which the rationale achieves the criteria set out above. Can students find examples of where the rationale achieves the criteria? Does the rationale provide ‘a clear explanation and understanding of the aspects being investigated’? What recommendations would students make to improve the rationale?

Rationale: An Example
Rationale
This written task relates to my study of the mass media and, in particular, to our focus on the language and structure of newspaper stories.

In addition, my written task is informed by my study of the ‘language situation’ in Quebec, Canada. In this part of my course, we considered the politics of English, studying a range of situations and contexts where speaking English was either advantageous or disadvantageous. Quebec is a francophone part of Canada. French speakers, I have learned, are often at an advantage in Quebec, whilst speakers of English are sometimes discriminated against.

I have learned that ‘language matters’, and that language cannot be separated from other aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Accordingly, for this written task, I have written a newspaper story that is intended to be included in The Toronto Star. This is an English language newspaper, Canada’s biggest selling ‘daily’, and is ‘left leaning’. I have assumed that the editorial position of the newspaper would support a plurality of languages in Canada. Whilst, I believe, the newspaper would recognize the particular importance of English and French in Canadian life, it would be critical of discriminatory practices based on language.

My news story tries to convey this ideology. In the story, I discuss the (imagined) case of a man who claims to have been discriminated against for his refusal to speak French during job interviews.

The newspaper story is intended to look and read authentically. Thus, for example, I have included a range of features typical of this text type. It has a headline, a sub-heading, a byline, and a lead. Paragraphs and sentences are short. Words are simple. Quotations (‘accessed voices’) are included. ‘Naming’ is also significant, not least because of the way it tries to ‘skew’ the story.

297 words
Teacher’s Comments
This is a sound rationale. It is likely to be awarded 2 marks. At 297 words, it approaches the word limit, and the rationale is quite succinct. The student doesn’t make explicit whether the Written Task is based on Part 1 or 2 of the course. However, this is not necessarily problematic; the suggestion is that the Written Task, in terms of content, relates mainly to Part 1 of the course, and the relationship between the Written Task and the course studied is clearly explained. The medium for the Written Task is a news story and the student intimates that the conventions associated with this text type were studied in Part 2 of the course. The student suggests that the Written Task will aim for authenticity; that is, the news story will be written for The Toronto Star. Finally, the student does well to highlight some of the key linguistic features of the text type, but could perhaps make more explicit the relationship of language to audiences, contexts, and purposes.

All in all, this is a successful rationale. It remains to be seen whether or not the accompanying Written Task is equally competent.

CHARACTERISATION – Key concept 1

 

Why do some fictional characters seem so real? How do writers bring these imaginary people to life? Characterization, or the art of creating a character, is a literary device that relies on narrative technique. Generally speaking there are four ways in which readers become familiar with fictional character:

  • by listening to the character in dialogue,
  • by viewing the character’s actions,
  • by overhearing the character’s thoughts,
  • through the narrator directly, who tells us what to think of the character.

 

images-1 images

For example, some of the most famous words from Hamlet, “to be or not to be,” tell us a lot about who he is. On stage he has to use a dramatic aside or monologue to convey his thoughts to the audience. He holds a skull in his hand, meaning he is pondering the difference between life and death. These actions and words help create the Hamlet that we know as pensive, indecisive person.

 

images-3

In this lesson we will look at a passage from The Handmaid’s Tale, a novel by Margaret Atwood. You do not need to know the novel to do this activity. Because the novel is told in the first person, we will only focus on the first three ways of achieving characterisation. You can apply this activity to any work you are reading for Part 3 or Part 4.

 

A. PRACTICE

WHAT KIND OF PERSON IS OFFRED?      The Handmaid

Judge by: HER DIALOGUES, HER ACTIONS and HER THOUGHTS …

B. APPLIED: Find evidence in chapter 1 (BOOK) that represents the actions, words and thoughts shown in the Film.

 

 

 

JANE EYRE – Context

VICTORIAN TIMES

 

1. Victorian Houses

In this interactive video we will explore a typical Victorian House. As we watch the video and move around they house, you are expected to answer some questions too. Be aware!

 

http://www.geffrye-museum.org.uk/learning/walk-through-a-victorian-house/walk-through/

 

2. A Quick glance at THE WORKSHOP OF THE WORLD DURING VICTORIAN TIMES

We will quickly explore the major events of the industrial revolution in the UK.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/workshop_of_the_world_01.shtml

 

IndustrialRevolution

 

3. During the last period we studied the role of women, gender and stereotypes in MASS MEDIA, this time we will be able to compare contemporary stereotypes with the gender roles during Victorian Times.

In pairs, you will explore specific sub-topics dealing with the role of women in a Victorian Society

(To understand Jane Eyre´s role too)

Female telegraph operators

The topics are:

  • The icon
  • The ideal woman
  • At home
  • Household management
  • The ideology
  • Wife and Mother
  • Social responsiblity
  • Women´s responsiblity
  • Towards a political mission

 

This is the link you need to collect information:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/victorian_britain/women_home/ideals_womanhood_01.shtml

 

AFTER READING ABOUT YOUR TOPIC, You will have 2 minutes to explian your topic to your classmates. GET READY!

DownloadedFile

 

 

 

Critical Study – IB Programme (Year 2)

In Part 4 – Literature: critical study we examine literary texts through a more form-focused lens. This is to say that close reading, textual analysis and critical literacy are at the heart of Part 4. There are several requirements to consider when engaging in texts throughout Part 4.

Texts
When selecting texts, it is important to keep the nature of the corresponding assessment in mind. Since students will be speaking about a passage from one of their Part 4 works, there should be a significant quantity of stylistic and structural features in these works. Poetry tends to be popular in Part 4, as poems are often dense in their use of language.

The texts we´ll use for this module and last part of the programme are:

ATONEMENT by Ian McEwan

ALFRED TENNYSON´s selected collection of poems

 

Assessment
In the individual oral commentary, students receive a 40-line passage from one of the Part 4 works. There are 20 minutes to prepare a 10-minute commentary on the text, after which a 5-minute discussion ensues. This form of Internal Assessment counts towards 15% of the final mark.

At SL students must also write at least one written task based on a literary work from either Parts 3 or 4. At HL students must write at least one written task based on a literary work from Part 3 and also one based on a work from Part 4.

OUTCOMES

Below are the three learning outcomes that one should aim to meet while studying Part 4 of the English Language and Literature course. For each outcome, a brief explanation is offered. The learning outcomes in bold are taken from the IB guide for Language A: Language and Literature.

1. Explore literary works in detail.
In Part 4, students engage in the close reading of literary texts. In order to meet this outcome, you will need to focus on extracts from a larger literary texts. Not only is this useful when preparing for the individual oral activity, but this enables one to focus on a specific literary devices, the placement of a smaller text in a greater context and the effects of a passage on the reader. Furthermore, at such a level of analysis, you may notice a difference between a text’s overt and covert messages.
2. Analyze elements such as theme and the ethical stance or moral values of literary texts.
Analyzing literary texts is like deciphering codes. Although writers are not always aware of the implications and meanings of their own texts, we want to try to make interpretations. “What does the author stand for?” is one question that you will inadvertently address while analyzine literary texts. Furthermore you may find yourself asking: “What is the author’s intention?” “How does he or she view the world?” Often, you can find answers when studying texts in depth.
3. Understand and make appropriate use of literary terms.
When analyzing literary texts, one needs to understand the mechanics of fiction and poetry. One question we should ask is: “What kinds of devices do writers make use of to convey a message or express a sentiment?” Identifying literary devices however, is only the beginning. One needs to go further and ask “What are the effects of these devices on the reader?”

FIND THE SPECIFIC PROCEDURES FOR ORAL COMMENTARY  HERE

https://ibpublishing.ibo.org/live-exist/rest/app/tsm.xql?doc=d_1_a1lan_tsm_1105_1b_e&part=3&chapter=11