Oral Presentations: POEM ANALYSIS

key aspects to consider in your oral analysis:

  1. You should demonstrate understanding of the thoughts and feelings expressed in the poem and how these are developed throughout the poem. What poetic devices serve this purpose?    Provide your analysis with enough evidence.
  2. Explain the second level of meaning of some of the words (connotations) that enhance the poem.
  3. Paraphrase the poem, that is, tell the poem in your own words.
  4. Explain the title and state to what extent it gives you clues to understand the poem.
  5. Explain if the rhyme pattern, rhythms, form and meter (line length, number of syllables, number of stanzas, etc) help develop the theme or not. If so, how?
  6. The language of your commentary must be clear, varied, precise and concise. You must keep your analysis formal and technical using words such as embody, depict, symbolise, portray, convey, tone, mood and theme.
  7. You can use a visual aid ( Ppt, Prezi) to support your presentation.

Felipe Parada – Lilian   (Monday)

Nicolás Whittle – Fatima   (Monday)

Martín Fernández – The burial of love   (Monday)

Alonso Jander – Duet   (Friday)

Nikos MacMillan – All things will die    (Friday)

Raimundo Bengoa – Come down O – maid     (Come down – O Maid)

Joaquín Alarcón – and I ask ye why these sad tears stream   (Tuesday)

Andrew Barroilhet – Blackbird   (Tuesday)

Agustín Letelier – By an evolutionist       (Friday)

Francisco Abusleme – Ring out Wild bells   (Friday)

Jeremy Ryan – Blow Bugle Blow       (Monday)

Check the assessment criteria below:

ORAL ANALYSIS IB RUBRIC

Alfred, Lord Tennyson – The charge of the light brigade

BASIC POEM ANALYSIS

TITLE

PARAPHRASE

CONNOTATION

ATTITUDE (TONE): It conveys the speaker´s attitude toward the poem subject.

SHIFTS

TITLE

THEMES (SUBJECT)

METER

RHYME PATTERN

DEVICES (ALLITERATION, ONOMATOPEIA, METAPHOR, ANAPHORA)

Elements of Poetry

Let´s start by a simple poem (Robert Frost´s Fire and Ice)

FIRE AND ICE

Some say the world will end in fire,

Some say in ice.

From what I’ve tasted of desire

I hold with those who favor fire,

But if it had to perish twice.

I think I know enough of hate

To say that for destruction ice

Is also great

And would suffice.

 

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In-class Activity

Pre-Reading

BBC POETRY: http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/poets/alfred_lord_tennyson.shtml

Reading

Objectives:

To explore vocabulary in order to understand the text.

To review basic elements of poetry (themes, images)

To identify the overall structure of the poem

The charge of the light brigade

WRITE YOUR IMPRESSIONS ABOUT THE POEM HERE

PADLET ON TENNYSON 

 

Further analysis

The charge of the light brigade analysis

Who is Alfred, Lord Tennyson?

WHO DO WE READ POETRY? WHAT WILL YOUR VERSE BE?

What is poetry?

1. SCENE II. Another part of the heath. Storm still.

Enter KING LEAR and Fool
KING LEAR
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks!
You sulphurous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Smite flat the thick rotundity o’ the world!
Crack nature’s moulds, an germens spill at once,
That make ingrateful man!

2.

Dust of Snow
BY ROBERT FROST
The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree

Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued.

3. Bad tempered, I got back:

Then, in the garden,

The willow tree.

(Oshima Ryota)

Poems: 1. Mariana 2. The Kraken 3. Tears, idle tears Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean, Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes, In looking on the happy Autumn-fields, And thinking of the days that are no more. Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail, That brings our friends up from the underworld, Sad as the last which reddens over one That sinks with all we love below the verge; So sad, so fresh, the days that are no more. Ah, sad and strange as in dark summer dawns The earliest pipe of half-awakened birds To dying ears, when unto dying eyes The casement slowly grows a glimmering square; So sad, so strange, the days that are no more. Dear as remembered kisses after death, And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned On lips that are for others; deep as love, Deep as first love, and wild with all regret; O Death in Life, the days that are no more.   Continue reading

Critical Study – IB Programme (Year 2)

In Part 4 – Literature: critical study we examine literary texts through a more form-focused lens. This is to say that close reading, textual analysis and critical literacy are at the heart of Part 4. There are several requirements to consider when engaging in texts throughout Part 4.

Texts
When selecting texts, it is important to keep the nature of the corresponding assessment in mind. Since students will be speaking about a passage from one of their Part 4 works, there should be a significant quantity of stylistic and structural features in these works. Poetry tends to be popular in Part 4, as poems are often dense in their use of language.

The texts we´ll use for this module and last part of the programme are:

ATONEMENT by Ian McEwan

ALFRED TENNYSON´s selected collection of poems

 

Assessment
In the individual oral commentary, students receive a 40-line passage from one of the Part 4 works. There are 20 minutes to prepare a 10-minute commentary on the text, after which a 5-minute discussion ensues. This form of Internal Assessment counts towards 15% of the final mark.

At SL students must also write at least one written task based on a literary work from either Parts 3 or 4. At HL students must write at least one written task based on a literary work from Part 3 and also one based on a work from Part 4.

OUTCOMES

Below are the three learning outcomes that one should aim to meet while studying Part 4 of the English Language and Literature course. For each outcome, a brief explanation is offered. The learning outcomes in bold are taken from the IB guide for Language A: Language and Literature.

1. Explore literary works in detail.
In Part 4, students engage in the close reading of literary texts. In order to meet this outcome, you will need to focus on extracts from a larger literary texts. Not only is this useful when preparing for the individual oral activity, but this enables one to focus on a specific literary devices, the placement of a smaller text in a greater context and the effects of a passage on the reader. Furthermore, at such a level of analysis, you may notice a difference between a text’s overt and covert messages.
2. Analyze elements such as theme and the ethical stance or moral values of literary texts.
Analyzing literary texts is like deciphering codes. Although writers are not always aware of the implications and meanings of their own texts, we want to try to make interpretations. “What does the author stand for?” is one question that you will inadvertently address while analyzine literary texts. Furthermore you may find yourself asking: “What is the author’s intention?” “How does he or she view the world?” Often, you can find answers when studying texts in depth.
3. Understand and make appropriate use of literary terms.
When analyzing literary texts, one needs to understand the mechanics of fiction and poetry. One question we should ask is: “What kinds of devices do writers make use of to convey a message or express a sentiment?” Identifying literary devices however, is only the beginning. One needs to go further and ask “What are the effects of these devices on the reader?”

FIND THE SPECIFIC PROCEDURES FOR ORAL COMMENTARY  HERE

https://ibpublishing.ibo.org/live-exist/rest/app/tsm.xql?doc=d_1_a1lan_tsm_1105_1b_e&part=3&chapter=11